The Vietnamese

Books in this division shed light on how the Vietnam War was understood and experienced by Vietnamese individuals. Subjects in this encompassing category range from South Vietnamese citizens who opposed their government and joined the Viet Cong, to South Vietnamese public figures who led the fight against communism, to leaders of the North Vietnamese struggle to conquer South Vietnam, to military officers who served in the South Vietnamese army.

Truong Nhu Tang gives you an insider's view of the struggle against the South Vietnamese government, although his story is by no means that of an "insider's insider". Not a Communist, he became disillusioned with his wartime allies soon after their April 1975 final defeat of the government in Saigon. The memoir retraces his unique and unforgettable journey from bourgeois origins in Saigon to higher education in France, then back to South Vietnam, where he became involved in the opposition, which led to his becoming a prominent member of the National Liberation Front, a.k.a. the Viet Cong. As an important member, he had experiences and made observations that are of great interest to outsiders. The amazing journey winds up with his being rescued from a small boat that had almost reached Indonesia, then on to exile in Paris.

Truong Nhu Tang gives you an insider's view of the struggle against the South Vietnamese government, although his story is by no means that of an "insider's insider". Not a Communist, he became disillusioned with his wartime allies soon after their April 1975 final defeat of the government in Saigon. The memoir retraces his unique and unforgettable journey from bourgeois origins in Saigon to higher education in France, then back to South Vietnam, where he became involved in the opposition, which led to his becoming a prominent member of the National Liberation Front, a.k.a. the Viet Cong. As an important member, he had experiences and made observations that are of great interest to outsiders. The amazing journey winds up with his being rescued from a small boat that had almost reached Indonesia, then on to exile in Paris.

During the Vietnam War, the names most commonly associated with North Vietnamese leadership were Ho Chi Minh and Vo Nguyen Giap. Researchers of North Vietnamese historical archives have demonstrated that the men most responsible for setting North Vietnamese policy were Le Duan, the General Secretary of the Central Committee from 1960 through 1986, and Le Duc Tho, his key ally. "Hanoi's War" makes important contributions in this direction, telling the story of the Vietnam War from Hanoi's point of view while introducing its true architects. One of the most fascinating episodes is the internal purge that preceded the 1968 Tet Offensive, cementing Le Duan's position as helmsman.

During the Vietnam War, the names most commonly associated with North Vietnamese leadership were Ho Chi Minh and Vo Nguyen Giap. Researchers of North Vietnamese historical archives have demonstrated that the men most responsible for setting North Vietnamese policy were Le Duan, the General Secretary of the Central Committee from 1960 through 1986, and Le Duc Tho, his key ally. "Hanoi's War" makes important contributions in this direction, telling the story of the Vietnam War from Hanoi's point of view while introducing its true architects. One of the most fascinating episodes is the internal purge that preceded the 1968 Tet Offensive, cementing Le Duan's position as helmsman.

The purpose of this book is to prove the following exact thesis: The essential mistake of the United States in Vietnam was in its withdrawal of support for South Vietnam's first President, Ngo Dinh Diem, and its acquiescence in the November 1963 coup that overthrew his government. This was done in the belief that South Vietnam needed to follow the American model of democratic governance and that Diem was an unpopular, overly authoritarian and divisive leader. The title "Lost Mandate of Heaven" is used to imply that he was an accepted and popular leader in the Far Eastern tradition. Following Diem's ouster and assassination, South Vietnam entered a period of political instability and escalated communist aggression, followed by heavy American military involvement.

The purpose of this book is to prove the following exact thesis: The essential mistake of the United States in Vietnam was in its withdrawal of support for South Vietnam's first President, Ngo Dinh Diem, and its acquiescence in the November 1963 coup that overthrew his government. This was done in the belief that South Vietnam needed to follow the American model of democratic governance and that Diem was an unpopular, overly authoritarian and divisive leader. The title "Lost Mandate of Heaven" is used to imply that he was an accepted and popular leader in the Far Eastern tradition. Following Diem's ouster and assassination, South Vietnam entered a period of political instability and escalated communist aggression, followed by heavy American military involvement.

Professor Andrew Wiest sets out to counter the reputation earned by the Army of the Republic of Vietnam for inefficiency, lack of energy in carrying out missions and corruption. He does this by focusing on two former ARVN officers whose paths through life were quite similar in their earlier phases but sharply diverged in their later years. Both were products of educated, middle-class families from the Vietnamese imperial capital city of Hue and both were career Army officers who fought valiantly during the 1968 Battle of Hue, earning U.S. military decorations. Yet after the U.S. withdrawal, in battles against overwhelmingly equipped North Vietnamese forces, one fought until his capture and endured thirteen years in prison, while one chose surrender and defection, after which he served as an instructor in the reeducation of his former army compatriots.

Professor Andrew Wiest sets out to counter the reputation earned by the Army of the Republic of Vietnam for inefficiency, lack of energy in carrying out missions and corruption. He does this by focusing on two former ARVN officers whose paths through life were quite similar in their earlier phases but sharply diverged in their later years. Both were products of educated, middle-class families from the Vietnamese imperial capital city of Hue and both were career Army officers who fought valiantly during the 1968 Battle of Hue, earning U.S. military decorations. Yet after the U.S. withdrawal, in battles against overwhelmingly equipped North Vietnamese forces, one fought until his capture and endured thirteen years in prison, while one chose surrender and defection, after which he served as an instructor in the reeducation of his former army compatriots.