My Lai Massacre

My Lai Massacre

Almost from the first revelations of the committing of war crimes by American soldiers, the U.S. Army realized that the essence of the story, and therefore responsibility for those events, hinged on the chain of command. The incident was covered up. When facts of the My Lai Massacre were finally given national exposure, America was polarized. The war crimes helped to unite a disparate opposition to American military involvement in Vietnam, although to others, Second Lieutenant William Calley was a scapegoat, if not a hero.

To create this new work, the authors went on a search for previously unpublished material. They spent several weeks at the U.S. Army Crime Records Center at Fort Belvoir, Virginia and the National Archives at College Park, Maryland, collecting testimonies of those present on the day of the My Lai Massacre and of those who investigated the incident and its cover-up. Those testimonies are arranged so that the reader can draw their own conclusions regarding whether war crimes took place, if the events at My Lai represented normal behavior for a U.S. soldier in Vietnam, if the nature of guerrilla warfare increases the likelihood of such excesses and whether the sentences meted out by the courts were justified.

My Lai: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford Series in History and Culture)
My Lai: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford Series in History and Culture)

To create this new work, the authors went on a search for previously unpublished material. They spent several weeks at the U.S. Army Crime Records Center at Fort Belvoir, Virginia and the National Archives at College Park, Maryland, collecting testimonies of those present on the day of the My Lai Massacre and of those who investigated the incident and its cover-up. Those testimonies are arranged so that the reader can draw their own conclusions regarding whether war crimes took place, if the events at My Lai represented normal behavior for a U.S. soldier in Vietnam, if the nature of guerrilla warfare increases the likelihood of such excesses and whether the sentences meted out by the courts were justified.

Four Hours in My Lai
By Michael Bilton

This is a book that comes to grips with the savagery of the events that took place in two Sơn Mỹ village hamlets on March 16, 1968, and with the dreadful consequences of their atrocities on soldiers who committed them. Soldiers can be haunted, during their lifetimes, by victims of their actions, through dreams, memories and workings of the human consciousness. Through extraordinary research, the authors reveal the fates of several American veteran participants, interview Vietnamese survivors of the slaughter, uncover noteworthy details obscured by the military court system, expose White House contrivance to obscure war crimes; and document a coverup involving dozens of Army officers, some of high rank.

Four Hours in My Lai
Four Hours in My Lai

This is a book that comes to grips with the <i>savagery</i> of the events that took place in two Sơn Mỹ village hamlets on March 16, 1968, and with the dreadful consequences of their atrocities on soldiers who committed them. Soldiers can be haunted, during their lifetimes, by victims of their actions, through dreams, memories and workings of the human consciousness. Through extraordinary research, the authors reveal the fates of several American veteran participants, interview Vietnamese survivors of the slaughter, uncover noteworthy details obscured by the military court system, expose White House contrivance to obscure war crimes; and document a coverup involving dozens of Army officers, some of high rank.

On my morning of March 16, 1968, Hugh Thompson was flying an observation helicopter in support of Task Force Barker, an ad-hoc unit to which Charlie Company had been assigned. His role was to draw enemy ground fire and then report the location of the hostile forces back to headquarters. Over the village of Son My he observed shocking behavior by members of Charlie Company. At one point was moved to land his helicopter and direct two crew members to rescue a group of Vietnamese civilians by training their guns on U.S. soldiers. For his later actions in attempting to bring the massacre to light he was vilified, although over time he became recognized as a hero. This book contains the full story of Warrant Officer Hugh Thompson.

The Forgotten Hero of My Lai: The Hugh Thompson Story (Revised Edition)
The Forgotten Hero of My Lai: The Hugh Thompson Story (Revised Edition)

On my morning of March 16, 1968, Hugh Thompson was flying an observation helicopter in support of Task Force Barker, an ad-hoc unit to which Charlie Company had been assigned. His role was to draw enemy ground fire and then report the location of the hostile forces back to headquarters. Over the village of Son My he observed shocking behavior by members of Charlie Company. At one point was moved to land his helicopter and direct two crew members to rescue a group of Vietnamese civilians by training their guns on U.S. soldiers. For his later actions in attempting to bring the massacre to light he was vilified, although over time he became recognized as a hero. This book contains the full story of Warrant Officer Hugh Thompson.

The culmination of nearly a decade of research and writing, "My Lai: Vietnam, 1968" attempts to offer a balanced account of the massacre and its aftermath, above all aiming to explain why the massacre took place. At first the My Lai Massacre was covered up, then there was an explosion of details. Participants told their stories multiple times, in different settings and at different points in time. Some remained consistent in their versions, some evolved their stories over time, some subtly and some dramatically. Among the most important sources of information about what occurred at My Lai are the accounts of Vietnamese survivors of the massacre, which have been included in this narrative.

My Lai: Vietnam, 1968, and the Descent into Darkness (Pivotal Moments in American History)
My Lai: Vietnam, 1968, and the Descent into Darkness (Pivotal Moments in American History)

The culmination of nearly a decade of research and writing, "My Lai: Vietnam, 1968" attempts to offer a balanced account of the massacre and its aftermath, above all aiming to explain why the massacre took place. At first the My Lai Massacre was covered up, then there was an explosion of details. Participants told their stories multiple times, in different settings and at different points in time. Some remained consistent in their versions, some evolved their stories over time, some subtly and some dramatically. Among the most important sources of information about what occurred at My Lai are the accounts of Vietnamese survivors of the massacre, which have been included in this narrative.