Marine Corps

Marine Corps

Following their arrival in Vietnam in 1965, the U.S. Marines Corps were assigned responsibility for South Vietnam's "I Corps Tactical Zone", which contained the provinces closest to North Vietnamese territory. They continued to fulfill that mission through March 1970. Initially sent to Vietnam as advisers, Marine activities expanded to include counterinsurgency and close air support. At the height of U.S. involvement in Vietnam, Marine units concentrated on large-scale search and destroy operations.

First published in 1977, Philip Caputo's book shattered barriers preventing the American public from beginning to perceive the wartime experiences of Vietnam veterans as they themselves did. In his renowned classic, Caputo succeeded in explaining to readers with no military experience what men do in a war, regardless of who they were in civilian life, and the effects of war on them. Readers were forced to ask how they themselves would have acted in the same situation and were given a chance to comprehend the exhilaration and terror experienced by Vietnam combat veterans, shattering America's indifference to their fate.

A Rumor of War: The Classic Vietnam Memoir (40th Anniversary Edition)
A Rumor of War: The Classic Vietnam Memoir (40th Anniversary Edition)

First published in 1977, Philip Caputo's book shattered barriers preventing the American public from beginning to perceive the wartime experiences of Vietnam veterans as they themselves did. In his renowned classic, Caputo succeeded in explaining to readers with no military experience what men do in a war, regardless of who they were in civilian life, and the effects of war on them. Readers were forced to ask how they themselves would have acted in the same situation and were given a chance to comprehend the exhilaration and terror experienced by Vietnam combat veterans, shattering America's indifference to their fate.

Hill 488
By Ray Hildreth

It was the night of June 15, 1966, in a former South Vietnamese province that was the site of heavy fighting, due its proximity to North Vietnam. An 18-man Marine reconnaissance platoon led by Staff Sergeant Jimmie E. Howard was on a hilltop observation post when they were attacked by an entire North Vietnamese battalion. The following morning, coauthor Ray Hildreth was one of only three Marines who were able to walk away unassisted. With coauthor Charles Sasser, a Green Beret veteran and a former combat correspondent, Hildreth has created a book that powerfully reveals both the brutality of war and the humanity and valor of troops fighting to save one another's lives.

Hill 488
Hill 488

It was the night of June 15, 1966, in a former South Vietnamese province that was the site of heavy fighting, due its proximity to North Vietnam. An 18-man Marine reconnaissance platoon led by Staff Sergeant Jimmie E. Howard was on a hilltop observation post when they were attacked by an entire North Vietnamese battalion. The following morning, coauthor Ray Hildreth was one of only three Marines who were able to walk away unassisted. With coauthor Charles Sasser, a Green Beret veteran and a former combat correspondent, Hildreth has created a book that powerfully reveals both the brutality of war and the humanity and valor of troops fighting to save one another's lives.

Marine Johnnie Clark arrived in Vietnam at the age of eighteen, at the height of the 1968 Tet Offensive. He served as a machine gunner and was wounded three times. The history of Clark's immediate family is steeped in tragedy, setting the stage for his memoir. He opens the prologue with the proclamation "this insanity really happened", then adds that some of his stories were verified from recently declassified U.S. Marine Corps archives and others by checking with a couple of friends who served with him. His book puts you on the ground, in the middle of the action, describing the brutality of jungle combat during the Vietnam War.

Guns Up!: A Firsthand Account of the Vietnam War
Guns Up!: A Firsthand Account of the Vietnam War

Marine Johnnie Clark arrived in Vietnam at the age of eighteen, at the height of the 1968 Tet Offensive. He served as a machine gunner and was wounded three times. The history of Clark's immediate family is steeped in tragedy, setting the stage for his memoir. He opens the prologue with the proclamation "this insanity really happened", then adds that some of his stories were verified from recently declassified U.S. Marine Corps archives and others by checking with a couple of friends who served with him. His book puts you on the ground, in the middle of the action, describing the brutality of jungle combat during the Vietnam War.

Serving a 13 month tour in Vietnam after having joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1965, James Dixon kept a journal wherein he recorded dates and places. After returning home, he tried to forget those experiences, never reading his journal, but the memories kept returning in flashbacks. By rereading the journal, countless experiences were recalled, and he decided to write them out in order to clarify and reflect on all that happened during those awe-filled days. In the book's conclusion, Dixon expresses deep resentment regarding the way that returning Vietnam veterans were treated, in his characteristically straightforward manner.

Things I'll Never forget: Memories of a Marine in Viet Nam
Things I'll Never forget: Memories of a Marine in Viet Nam

Serving a 13 month tour in Vietnam after having joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1965, James Dixon kept a journal wherein he recorded dates and places. After returning home, he tried to forget those experiences, never reading his journal, but the memories kept returning in flashbacks. By rereading the journal, countless experiences were recalled, and he decided to write them out in order to clarify and reflect on all that happened during those awe-filled days. In the book's conclusion, Dixon expresses deep resentment regarding the way that returning Vietnam veterans were treated, in his characteristically straightforward manner.

Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills
By Charles Henderson

Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock had always dreamed of becoming a U.S. Marine and enlisted in 1959; only 17 years old at the time. He deployed to Vietnam in 1966 as a military policeman and was soon transferred to the 1st Marine Division Sniper Platoon, stationed south of Da Nang. Hathcock had an illustrious career with the USMC, most prominently as the top sniper in Viet Nam, chalking up 93 confirmed kills and countless more unconfirmed. His legendary exploits included infiltrating the headquarters of a North Vietnamese general, pinning down a company of enemy soldiers for several days, and stalking enemy snipers.

Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills
Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills

Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock had always dreamed of becoming a U.S. Marine and enlisted in 1959; only 17 years old at the time. He deployed to Vietnam in 1966 as a military policeman and was soon transferred to the 1st Marine Division Sniper Platoon, stationed south of Da Nang. Hathcock had an illustrious career with the USMC, most prominently as the top sniper in Viet Nam, chalking up 93 confirmed kills and countless more unconfirmed. His legendary exploits included infiltrating the headquarters of a North Vietnamese general, pinning down a company of enemy soldiers for several days, and stalking enemy snipers.

The Hill Fights occurred a little over half a year before the siege of the Khe Sanh Combat Base began and are now viewed as a preliminary stage of the Battle of Khe Sanh. The North Vietnamese needed to be prevented from using the hills to observe activities at that Marine Corps base and from firing down upon it. As a 19-year-old Marine, Robert Maras participated in the Hill Fights at Khe Sanh, enduring almost continuous firefights for more than two weeks. Maras avoided talking about this experience until, as part of therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, he began to write down his story. With help from coauthor Charles W. Sasser, the result is this hour-by-hour, day-by-day account of this episode.

Blood in the Hills: The Story of Khe Sanh, the Most Savage Fight of the Vietnam War
Blood in the Hills: The Story of Khe Sanh, the Most Savage Fight of the Vietnam War

The Hill Fights occurred a little over half a year before the siege of the Khe Sanh Combat Base began and are now viewed as a preliminary stage of the Battle of Khe Sanh. The North Vietnamese needed to be prevented from using the hills to observe activities at that Marine Corps base and from firing down upon it. As a 19-year-old Marine, Robert Maras participated in the Hill Fights at Khe Sanh, enduring almost continuous firefights for more than two weeks. Maras avoided talking about this experience until, as part of therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, he began to write down his story. With help from coauthor Charles W. Sasser, the result is this hour-by-hour, day-by-day account of this episode.