Major Battles

Major Battles

North Vietnamese strategists wisely avoided large head-on confrontations with U.S. military forces. The industrially backward Vietnamese were no match against the firepower available to U.S. ground forces and had little protection from American bombers and gunships. Yet, there were exceptions. In 1965, North Vietnamese forces stood toe-to-toe with U.S. airborne infantry at Ia Drang. In 1968 they launched a full-blown offensive, with no less of a goal than to topple the South Vietnamese government.

In an extraordinarily bold move in early 1968, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops entered and took control of the city of Hue, South Vietnam's historical capital and its third largest city. They managed to hold on for over a month before being driving out by combined American and South Vietnamese forces. Bestselling author Mark Bowden interviewed Battle of Hue participants from the U.S. Marine Corps and Army, the South and North Vietnamese armies and the Viet Cong, and researched American and Vietnamese war archives, in order to create a compelling and highly readable day-by-day account of this critical turning point in the Vietnam War.

Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam
Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam

In an extraordinarily bold move in early 1968, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops entered and took control of the city of Hue, South Vietnam's historical capital and its third largest city. They managed to hold on for over a month before being driving out by combined American and South Vietnamese forces. Bestselling author Mark Bowden interviewed Battle of Hue participants from the U.S. Marine Corps and Army, the South and North Vietnamese armies and the Viet Cong, and researched American and Vietnamese war archives, in order to create a compelling and highly readable day-by-day account of this critical turning point in the Vietnam War.

Forty young American soldiers belonging to Echo Company, a reconnaissance platoon of the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division, arrive in Vietnam. Having only been in-country for a few weeks, they are suddenly thrust into the savage combat of the 1968 Tet Offensive. This volume is the product of hundreds of hours of interviews, some of which stretched over days, personal journals, dozens of letters sent from the battlefield, after-action reports, and visits to original scenes of combat with some of the Echo Company veterans.

The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War
The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War

Forty young American soldiers belonging to Echo Company, a reconnaissance platoon of the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division, arrive in Vietnam. Having only been in-country for a few weeks, they are suddenly thrust into the savage combat of the 1968 Tet Offensive. This volume is the product of hundreds of hours of interviews, some of which stretched over days, personal journals, dozens of letters sent from the battlefield, after-action reports, and visits to original scenes of combat with some of the Echo Company veterans.

We Were Soldiers Once . . . And Young - Ia Drang, The Battle That Changed The War In Vietnam
By Harold G., Lt. Gen., Usa, (ret.) and Galloway, Joseph L. Moore

In November 1965, at the Battle of Ia Drang Valley, coauthor Hal Moore was in command at the first of the two landing zones where fighting broke out. Coauthor Joseph Galloway was the only journalist on the ground throughout the encounter. The Battle of Ia Drang was the first major battle between United States and North Vietnamese ground forces and was the first incident in Vietnam in which the U.S. suffered truly horrific casualties, changing the character of the war completely. In preparing their treatise, the authors interviewed former North Vietnamese commanders, enabling them to provide fascinating insights into enemy strategy and reckonings.

We Were Soldiers Once . . . And Young - Ia Drang, The Battle That Changed The War In Vietnam
We Were Soldiers Once . . . And Young - Ia Drang, The Battle That Changed The War In Vietnam

In November 1965, at the Battle of Ia Drang Valley, coauthor Hal Moore was in command at the first of the two landing zones where fighting broke out. Coauthor Joseph Galloway was the only journalist on the ground throughout the encounter. The Battle of Ia Drang was the first major battle between United States and North Vietnamese ground forces and was the first incident in Vietnam in which the U.S. suffered truly horrific casualties, changing the character of the war completely. In preparing their treatise, the authors interviewed former North Vietnamese commanders, enabling them to provide fascinating insights into enemy strategy and reckonings.

In the second half of 1967, North Vietnam launched a series of offensive initiatives along South Vietnam's western border and south of the Demilitarized Zone. The objective was to draw American and South Vietnamese forces away from the heavily populated coastal regions in preparation for the Tet Offensive, which was intended to spark popular uprisings in South Vietnam's major cities. The Battle of Dak To was one of these "border battles". At Dak To, the "Sky Soldiers" of the 173rd Infantry Brigade suffered heavy casualties in some of the fiercest combat of the Vietnam War. Edward F. Murray captures the heroism and the degradation revealed at the Battle of Dak To in his compelling narrative, which is based on letters, official reports, diaries and interviews with more than eighty Dak To veterans.

Dak To: America's Sky Soldiers in South Vietnam's Central Highlands
Dak To: America's Sky Soldiers in South Vietnam's Central Highlands

In the second half of 1967, North Vietnam launched a series of offensive initiatives along South Vietnam's western border and south of the Demilitarized Zone. The objective was to draw American and South Vietnamese forces away from the heavily populated coastal regions in preparation for the Tet Offensive, which was intended to spark popular uprisings in South Vietnam's major cities. The Battle of Dak To was one of these "border battles". At Dak To, the "Sky Soldiers" of the 173rd Infantry Brigade suffered heavy casualties in some of the fiercest combat of the Vietnam War. Edward F. Murray captures the heroism and the degradation revealed at the Battle of Dak To in his compelling narrative, which is based on letters, official reports, diaries and interviews with more than eighty Dak To veterans.

"This Time We Win" was first published in 2010, a year before the completion of the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq and about half a year before the beginning of the U.S. drawdown in Afghanistan. Author James S. Robbins had seen America's Islamist enemies, including none other than Osama Bin Laden, use the Tet Offensive as a means of rallying devotees to the struggle against America. It was proclaimed that despite the overwhelming military strength of the United States, it could be defeated by way of attacking public morale through a cooperative media. Robbins was moved to publish this reassessment of the Tet Offensive, in order to demonstrate that it was a crushing defeat for North Vietnam, in every way.

This Time We Win: Revisiting the Tet Offensive
This Time We Win: Revisiting the Tet Offensive

"This Time We Win" was first published in 2010, a year before the completion of the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq and about half a year before the beginning of the U.S. drawdown in Afghanistan. Author James S. Robbins had seen America's Islamist enemies, including none other than Osama Bin Laden, use the Tet Offensive as a means of rallying devotees to the struggle against America. It was proclaimed that despite the overwhelming military strength of the United States, it could be defeated by way of attacking public morale through a cooperative media. Robbins was moved to publish this reassessment of the Tet Offensive, in order to demonstrate that it was a crushing defeat for North Vietnam, in every way.