Helicopter Combat

In Vietnam, the United States relied on the helicopter as never before. With terrain hostile to trucks and armored vehicles, the helicopter became the primary means of moving troops and keeping them supplied with food, water, equipment and ammunition. Rotorcraft designs were invented in order to create efficient and deadly weapons platforms. Helicopters also played vital roles in medical evacuation and in search and rescue operations.

Cobra gunship pilot Lew Jennings flew 726 missions in Vietnam from 1969 to 1970 and was awarded with over 50 combat decorations for his service. He gives vivid descriptions of hunter-killer missions in Vietnam. Jennings recounts hair-raising episodes during the Battle of Hamburger Hill and in the A Shau Valley, a key North Vietnamese infiltration point into South Vietnam, by way of the Ho Chi Minh trail. If you're seeking an authentic look at the life of a helicopter pilot in Vietnam, stop right here.

Cobra gunship pilot Lew Jennings flew 726 missions in Vietnam from 1969 to 1970 and was awarded with over 50 combat decorations for his service. He gives vivid descriptions of hunter-killer missions in Vietnam. Jennings recounts hair-raising episodes during the Battle of Hamburger Hill and in the A Shau Valley, a key North Vietnamese infiltration point into South Vietnam, by way of the Ho Chi Minh trail. If you're seeking an authentic look at the life of a helicopter pilot in Vietnam, stop right here.

Chickenhawk
By Robert Mason

Having graduated from the U.S. Army's Primary Helicopter School at Fort Wolters, Texas in 1965, Robert Mason was deployed to Vietnam, where he flew more than one thousand combat missions with the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) and the 48th Assault Helicopter Company. During his one year tour he participated in the Battle of Ia Drang Valley and he gives captivating, detailed accounts of his experiences at the landing zones. Mason cuts to the heart of the combat experience of a Huey "Slick" pilot and his book is universally regarded as one of the best Vietnam War memoirs.

Having graduated from the U.S. Army's Primary Helicopter School at Fort Wolters, Texas in 1965, Robert Mason was deployed to Vietnam, where he flew more than one thousand combat missions with the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) and the 48th Assault Helicopter Company. During his one year tour he participated in the Battle of Ia Drang Valley and he gives captivating, detailed accounts of his experiences at the landing zones. Mason cuts to the heart of the combat experience of a Huey "Slick" pilot and his book is universally regarded as one of the best Vietnam War memoirs.

From June 1967 through June 1968, Tom Johnson logged an astounding 1,150 combat flying hours with the 1st Air Cavalry Division. He survived key battles and rescue missions during the Tet Offensive, at places with well-known names like Hue, Khe Sanh and the A Shau Valley. Johnson's writing style is descriptive and clear, describing incidents with vivid imagery replete with operational details, sharing with the reader the experiences of rank-and-file Huey crews Vietnam. This is a book that takes you on a first-person journey through the chaos of war, nailing the sensation of transporting air cavalrymen into the heat of battle.

From June 1967 through June 1968, Tom Johnson logged an astounding 1,150 combat flying hours with the 1st Air Cavalry Division. He survived key battles and rescue missions during the Tet Offensive, at places with well-known names like Hue, Khe Sanh and the A Shau Valley. Johnson's writing style is descriptive and clear, describing incidents with vivid imagery replete with operational details, sharing with the reader the experiences of rank-and-file Huey crews Vietnam. This is a book that takes you on a first-person journey through the chaos of war, nailing the sensation of transporting air cavalrymen into the heat of battle.

In 1967-68, at the height of U.S. military involvement in Vietnam, Mark Garrison was a Huey gunship pilot with the 119th Assault Helicopter Company in the Central Highlands. The 119th AHC provided support for the U.S. Army, the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army Special Forces and the South Vietnamese Army, and flew classified missions for the MACV-SOG. In this honest and brutal account, Garrison depicts what he calls a surrealistic experience, extremely difficult to transpose to paper: Being a helicopter pilot during the heaviest fighting of the Vietnam War.

In 1967-68, at the height of U.S. military involvement in Vietnam, Mark Garrison was a Huey gunship pilot with the 119th Assault Helicopter Company in the Central Highlands. The 119th AHC provided support for the U.S. Army, the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army Special Forces and the South Vietnamese Army, and flew classified missions for the MACV-SOG. In this honest and brutal account, Garrison depicts what he calls a surrealistic experience, extremely difficult to transpose to paper: Being a helicopter pilot during the heaviest fighting of the Vietnam War.

Low Level Hell
By Hugh L. Mills Jr.

The job of the military scout has always been an extremely hazardous one. The role of the aeroscout came into its own in Vietnam, where scout helicopter pilots achieved a level of effectiveness far surpassing their forerunners. Author Hugh Mills served two tours in Vietnam, where he was instrumental in developing and improving upon scout helicopter tactics. During that timespan he was shot down sixteen times and wounded three times. In his exceptionally well-written and captivating memoir, Mills shows the Vietnam War through the eyes of a scout helicopter pilot, flying low, just above the jungle canopy, searching for enemy gatherings and discovering them with monotonous regularity.

The job of the military scout has always been an extremely hazardous one. The role of the aeroscout came into its own in Vietnam, where scout helicopter pilots achieved a level of effectiveness far surpassing their forerunners. Author Hugh Mills served two tours in Vietnam, where he was instrumental in developing and improving upon scout helicopter tactics. During that timespan he was shot down sixteen times and wounded three times. In his exceptionally well-written and captivating memoir, Mills shows the Vietnam War through the eyes of a scout helicopter pilot, flying low, just above the jungle canopy, searching for enemy gatherings and discovering them with monotonous regularity.